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Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. This title will be released July 7. Aug 24, Sensitivemuse rated it liked it. The Blue Notebook by James Levine is told in the point of view of Batuk, a young girl who has been sold into prostitution by her father. From then on, she works through several places, including the streets of Mumbai, then being bought from place to place where her final place ends up being in some sort of hotel.

It's a hard read. Although being only two hundred pages, it is an account in extreme graphic detail of Batuk's life after being sold by her father. She does not skimp away the grisly de The Blue Notebook by James Levine is told in the point of view of Batuk, a young girl who has been sold into prostitution by her father.

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She does not skimp away the grisly details that happens to her and how she is meant to please her clients. The only light hearted moments I get are when she shares a laugh with her friend Puneet and how they make fun of the "Hippopotamus". I thought they were so cute together but, even that little bit of happiness fades as Batuk is passed on to another place to do her work.

My heart went out for Batuk. You see her innocence shatter and how she narrates the entire story you don't hear much emotion, it's almost as you can hear a flat voice through the diary entries. It's a bleak and depressing read but it probably is a very realistic account of what happens out there to child prostitutes anywhere in the world.

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There are only a few things I didn't agree with in this book. I'm not for flowery poetry writing and mini stories and there's a few parts of that in this story. I mostly skipped it by as I didn't have much patience for that. I don't really understand how you can be that literate when you've only learned to read and write at a missionary hospital but that's just my opinion. Second, the ending was very vague.

However, if you really think about it, no one in this world really cares where a prostitute ends up, therefore the ending shouldn't matter. It's very shocking, but it's sadly true however, I would have liked to know where Batuk ended up. Also note, due to the graphic nature and content this is not for the squeamish.

'I have dedicated my time, my heart and soul to free these children'

It didn't bother me much, but there were parts where I cringed. Overall a very sad and in depth look into the life of a child slave. It'll make you feel for the millions of child slaves and helpless women out there suffering where they have no control over their lives and sadly, no where to turn to. Sep 03, Susan Storm rated it liked it.

I always enjoy reading books about people who overcome deep struggles and harsh circumstances, and so I was really drawn into this book. It's written in the first person by Batuk, a young girl sold by her family into child prostitution at the age of nine. She writes down her experiences in her 'blue notebook' and through her eyes we get to see the terror that these kids face on a daily basis, but through the eyes of a child.

Through all that she suffers she writes with intense imagination and ev I always enjoy reading books about people who overcome deep struggles and harsh circumstances, and so I was really drawn into this book. Through all that she suffers she writes with intense imagination and even optimism. When she writes about her 'work' she does it in such a lush, childlike way that it could be less or more disturbing at times.

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Less disturbing because it seemed less harsh, but more disturbing because it's obvious in her writing that she's still just a child. What I liked: This book gave a very real idea of what kids in this situation face, and it really makes you think about what you can do to help. All the proceeds from the book are going to be used to help exploited children, that was definitely a plus. What I disliked: I had a hard time with certain sections because I feel there is a fine line between pornographic stories and description of brutal acts.

I had a really hard time reading it without contemplating whether some would find these scenes titillating. The writing is almost too 'pretty' for some of the horrible things that happen. I felt like for a long section the book was just a series of sexual encounters, and they described what happened a little too vividly.

I have the stomach for it but I felt like the detail was a drawback and since Batuk is just a child, I felt like it should have been a little more tasteful. I don't want them to make the facts less harsh, these things happen, but the way it was described was a little too sensual. View all 4 comments. Jul 04, Mary rated it really liked it Shelves: adult-books. This is definitely not a book for children.

It covers some of the same ground as the movie Slumdog Millionaire. Batuk was 9 when her father sold her into prostitution in Mumbai. She is "nested" on the Common Street, where Mamaki Briila oversees the girls and one boy, Puneet, who is Batuk's good friend. The story begins as Batuk is She keeps writings of her days, because she was taught to read and write in the hospital where she spent months recovering from TB, and because one of the men who This is definitely not a book for children.

She keeps writings of her days, because she was taught to read and write in the hospital where she spent months recovering from TB, and because one of the men who visits her gives her a pencil. After a while, Batuk is purchased by a businessman, Bubba, for his son, Iftikhar, and taken to a hotel. She stays for several days in the Tiger Suite, cared for by Kita, raped by the doctor who examines her, and beaten badly by Iftikhar. One night he has a party with 3 friends, some of whom are politically connected, and when Batuk's writings are discovered and read aloud, things get out of hand.

This book is both hopeless and hopeful. Batuk escapes the reality of her situation in writing and in her imagination, and that seems to carry the reader along as well. Sometimes though, it seems almost too poetic - not gritty enough to be realistic. Nov 03, Lydia Presley rated it liked it Shelves: india , fiction. What a horrifying story. From the book jacket, the story of how this book was written is told. Levine, a doctor at the Mayo Clinic, was interviewing homeless children on a street in Mumbai where the child prostitutes work.

A young woman was writing in a notebook outside of her cage. This captured his attention and, in turn, resulted in this book. The imagery is horrifying - too much so, in my opinion. I understand that the author was trying to impress upon his readers the gravity and horror of th What a horrifying story.

I understand that the author was trying to impress upon his readers the gravity and horror of the situation, but there was too much information divulged. The readers of this book are, I would hope, intelligent enough to understand what is happening without our hand being held through it all. The actual story of the girl was heart-breaking.

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In a world where happy endings just don't happen all that often, this is a stark reminder of that. The author has done a good deed in donating all his U. May 22, Stephanie rated it really liked it. I won an advanced copy of this book and received it in the mail today. I read the book in one sitting - no joke. I was riveted by the story. Batuk, a nine-year old Indian girl, is sold into sex slavery. At fifteen, she understands her lot in life, but believes in something more Despite the abuses at so many hands, she is resilient and hopeful.

Beautifully heartbreaking Well-crafted, although wanted more ans I won an advanced copy of this book and received it in the mail today. Well-crafted, although wanted more answers at the end. I will say that I had to suspend a certain reality to believe that a 15 year old girl with no real formal education except during her extended stay in a hospital while being treated for TB could write so well, but the story made me willing to do it.

Sep 13, Charlaralotte rated it it was ok Shelves: read-in Upset with myself that I was unable to finish this book, but found it getting slightly prurient or my interpretation of it getting that way. Am of course all for the goal of the book: to expose the horrible conditions and hardships of children sold into prostitution in India.

Absolutely terrible, heinous crimes being committed. Also appreciated author's efforts to show hidden, undaunted strength of one girl. Just got a bit queasy with the metaphorical descriptions of "making sweetcakes" with c Upset with myself that I was unable to finish this book, but found it getting slightly prurient or my interpretation of it getting that way.

Just got a bit queasy with the metaphorical descriptions of "making sweetcakes" with clients. Fine line between pornographic stories and description of brutal acts. Found it difficult to read without contemplating whether some would find these scenes titillating. Perhaps is an issue with any detailed accounts of sex crimes.

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Jun 07, Garrett Marshall rated it it was amazing. The population of chilliwack goes "missing" every year in india. India needs to have sanctions and pressure put on it to take responsibility for these countless nameless thousands who are the victims of a culture who put no value other then financial on the lives of women.

Its beautifully composed and extreamly enlightening. Dec 27, Christie rated it liked it.